New Fairline Targa 65 GT | How to Run Inlets | Yamaha AR240 - 09/30/2019
BoatTEST Newsletter September 30, 2019 Click here if you cannot view the newsletter.
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New Features Video

Fairline Targa 65 GT:
Italian Design w/Solid Dutch Engineering

BOAT NAME
Fairline Targa 65 GT

The Fairline Targa 65 GT, designed by the Italian firm of Alberto Mancini, has the lines of a high-end European sports car plus a solid build engineered by the Dutch naval architecture firm Vripack. The combination delivers a package where both form and function are pleasing to experienced yachtsmen. Inventive features are abundant, including a “rumble seat” that flips out of the transom and a flip-up freshwater shower that is also in the transom. The bow also gets special attention with a large wrap-around settee and two sun pads that are convertible to chaise seating. Note the large hullside windows which give occupants below an exciting waterside experience. More...

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Test Video

Bennington Q27:
10' Beam, 58 MPH WOT, 2.0 MPG

BOAT NAME
Bennington Q27

The premium class Bennington Q27 is different in many ways from what most think of as a pontoon boat. For starters, she is fast -- with twin 300-hp Evinrude E-TEC G2 outboards -- she topped out at 58 mph in our test runs, fast enough to embarrass a few “performance boats” we can think of. She is also fuel efficient, considering that 600 horsepower on the transoms -- 2.0 mpg at 34.7 mph. And, she’s wider than most pontoon boats, with a 10’ (3 m) beam rather than 8’6” (2.6 m). She can carry up to 16 people. More...

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Test Video

Yamaha AR240:
Ready for Watersports and Relaxing

BOAT NAME
Yamaha AR240

The business end of the Yamaha AR240 is clearly the transom and aft seating, where users will gear up for watersports, diving or swimming, or just relaxing while at anchor. Draft is just 20" (50.8 cm) including the drives and the Articulating Keel steering system, greatly reducing chances of running aground compared to propeller-drive boats. She has plenty of power for performance with twin 1.8 Yamaha H.O. engines, getting on plane in 2.3 seconds -- a match for all but the fastest PWCs and leaving most prop boats in her wake. Top speed was 51.8 mph. Despite all the power, she delivers a relatively quiet ride, just 76 dBA at a cruise of 27.9 mph. More...

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Test Video

Cruisers Yachts 54 Cantius:
Easy Operation, Simplified Docking

BOAT NAME
Cruisers Yachts 54 Cantius

The helm of the Cruisers Yachts 54 Cantius has a clean "glass dash" effect with twin 15" (38 cm) displays under the glass. The digital throttles are on top of the starboard subpanel and the joystick for controlling the twin Volvo Penta IPS950s is mounted to port. This location is convenient for stern-to docking as the captain can stand next to the console looking aft, put the left hand on the joystick, and maneuver into the slip. There’s a good view of both sides of the boat looking aft. A second control station can be located on either side of the aft deck to ease things even more for those who prefer. More...

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Test Video

Ranger VS1782 WT:
Fully-Loaded Aluminum Fishing Package

BOAT NAME
Ranger VS1782 WT

Ranger, best-known for building top-shelf fiberglass bass boats, also builds high-quality aluminum boats like the Ranger VS1782 WT. She is a dual console design that's ideal for chasing walleyes, pike and other species on rocky and sometimes rough northern lakes and rivers. Unlike some aluminum builds, this one has no wood in decks or transom -- she is all .125-gauge aluminum, which means she’ll last for generations, and the deck won’t go soggy. Seating is built in-house and it is premium-grade. Weight is just 2,240 lbs. (1,016 kg) rigged with a Mercury 150 FourStroke (a 115 is standard), which means easy towing behind mid-size vehicles. A single-axle RangerTrail trailer is part of the package. More...

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Safety Tips

How to Run Hazardous Inlets

uscg report
In this article, we look at two disastrous approaches in the hopes that we all can learn lessons from the mistakes of others.

When running a hazardous inlet, most often, timing is everything. Sometimes it’s better to wait for a tide change, nearly all times it’s better to time your approach to the waves entering the inlet. When you have to run it at a certain time, there are definite techniques that will make the task safer. In this article, we explain how to do it, and how not to do it using a near disaster that Capt. Steve found himself in. Let’s all learn from the mistake. More...



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All articles, Captain's Reports, video content or other material which appear on BoatTEST.com and in its newsletters are accurate and factual to the best knowledge of BoatTEST.com and its staff. All findings, beliefs, experiences or endorsements presented are the honest opinions of BoatTEST.com or its contributors. In compliance with FTC 16 CFR Part 255, BoatTEST.com advises its readers that the content which appears in its newsletter or on its website may have been produced for compensation or the prospect of future compensation. BoatTEST.com makes no claims for the veracity or motivation of reader comments, Owners' Reports and other contributions which are all clearly labeled as such.



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