We Compare 20'-21' Sportboats: 4 Affordable Bowriders - 03/27/2018
Sea Ray SPX 210 OB
Sea Ray SPX 210 OB
Tahoe 550 TS
Tahoe 550 TS
Chaparral 21 H2O OB Sport
Chaparral 21 H2O OB Sport
Glastron GTS 205
Glastron GTS 205

Good things often come in small packages. Consider the four sportboats in this comparison: All are among the lowest-priced boats in their size range yet each one is from a recognized “name” brand. Each one has the performance it takes to keep younger boaters interested and to remind older boaters that age is just a number. But, since they are “value-oriented” models, the trick is to find the boat which has not skimped on the very thing you want to have. Each builder has taken a slightly different approach to creating an affordable boat.

THE COMPARISON STARTS HERE

Folks just starting out on the boating lifestyle, and those with many sea miles under their keels, should find a boat to like in this roundup. All four are very similar in size and specification, in layout, and in performance, so choosing one over the others boils down to details. Each builder has a slightly different approach to producing an affordable boat.

Three are outboard-powered, adding space and stowage in the cockpit but infringing, sometimes just a bit, sometimes more, on the swim platform. The fourth boat is a classic sterndrive, with a full-beam, unencumbered platform that's a playground for watersports fans.

Realistic Capacity. Each boat has enough room in the cockpit for four adults to spread out without banging elbows; add kids to the mix and there's space for a couple more people. Boats this size don't have expansive forward cockpits, but they're big enough to relax two adults, or corral a bunch of kids to get them out of the grownups' hair when anchored.

Power. At just 21’ (6.40 m), give or take a few inches, these four boats need little in the way of horsepower compared to boats just a couple of feet longer. The sterndrive Glastron GTS 205 is rated for 300-hp, max, but should perform fine with 200-hp (although we haven't tested this boat, and cannot provide hard numbers); the other three boats carry 175- to 200-hp outboards, max. We tested all three with 150 hp and found them to top out between 40 and 42 knots; plenty fast for boats in this class. Engines this size are less expensive to buy, making these boats affordable for more people; maintenance and operating costs are minimal, too.

Ask A Question About Any of These Boats

Sea Ray's SPX 210 OB

Sea Ray SPX 210 OB
The Sea Ray SPX 210 OB has optional packages that allow a buyer to make sure the boat has just what is needed.

Sea Ray's SPX 210 OB is the outboard-powered sistership of the sterndrive SPX 210. Other than engines, the boats are almost exactly the same; the 210 OB is about 300 lbs. (136 kg)  lighter, and draws about an inch less water with the motor tilted up. Offering essentially the same boat with either outboard or sterndrive power is becoming more common now that outboards are as efficient as sterndrives, as reliable, and easier to maintain.

Sea Ray builds eight models in OB and SD configurations, including the SPX 190, the smaller sister of this boat.

Are there performance advantages to outboard vs. sterndrive power? We've tested both the SPX 210 OB, with the standard 150-hp Mercury FourStroke, and the sterndrive SPX 210 with a 200-hp Mercury 4.5L, also standard for that model. The lighter-weight outboard boat is a bit faster at MPH WOT (40.4 knots vs. 39.7); cruises a tad farther on a tank of fuel (157 vs. 145 n.m.); is a whisker faster at the most efficient speed (23.8 vs. 23.4 knots.); and costs $1,108 less, $41,493 base vs. $42,601, per the Sea Ray website.

On the other hand, the sterndrive SPX 210 has a clear swim platform for wakeboarding, waterskiing, etc. Although Sea Ray did a good job preserving the full-beam platform on the SPX 210 OB, by bolting the outboard to the aft face of the platform rather than notching the platform for the motor, as many builders do. Also, remember that the 4.5 L 6-cylinder sterndrive has more low-end torque than the 3.0 L 4-cylinder outboard engine. That means that this model should do a better job of pulling up wake boarders faster.

Bottom line? In our opinion, it's a toss-up.

Several options packages let each buyer customize his/her SPX 210 OB for specific activities: The All-Sports package adds fishing gear, including casting chairs and a trolling motor; the Elevation package, a watersports tower and wakeboard racks; the Select package, upgraded upholstery and a premium dash. Buyers needing more power can upgrade to a Mercury 200XL Verado Pro ($9,667).

The Sea Ray SPX 210 OB is the largest boat of the four we are comparing, and is 725 lbs. (329 kg) or 30% heavier than the lightest boat of the four. At 8’6” (2.59 m) she is also the beamiest and therefore has the most interior volume of the four boats.

SPX 210 OB

BOAT NAME #1 Interior
BOAT NAME #1 Interior
  • LOA: 21'6" (6.55 m) w/o motor
  • Beam: 8'6'' (2.59 m)
  • Draft: 17" (.43 m)
  • Displacement: 3,120 lbs. (1,415 kg)
  • Deadrise at Transom: 19 degrees
  • Fuel Capacity: 40 gal. (151 L)
  • Maximum Power: 200-hp Mercury FourStroke


Tahoe's 550 TS

Tahoe 550 TS
The Tahoe 550 TS Outboard is a newly-designed model that looks as good as the more expensive competition. Note the wraparound windscreen.

Tahoe's 550 TS Outboard has a somewhat higher freeboard than most boats in this class, so it should be drier in choppy conditions. She also has deeper, more secure seating, an excellent safety feature for buyers with active kids in the crew. Like all Tahoes, she's sold complete, including outboard, trailer, and almost all necessary equipment for an attractive national price of $26,995 with a 115-hp Mercury FourStroke outboard. We'd upgrade to a Mercury 150 4-Stroke or 150XL OptiMax Pro -- $3,500 extra for either one.

With the 150-hp 4-Stroke, the Tahoe 550 TS Outboard performed well in our test, hitting a top speed of 42.4 knots The test captain reported that, in maneuvers, "the boat felt nimble and sporty, whipping through S turns and circles without hooking out in a hard turn." She rides on Tahoe's Powerglide II bottom, which gives the hull a longer running surface with bottom strakes designed to improve acceleration and turning, according to the manufacturer.

OptiMax is Mercuy’s 2-Stroke line and they are worth considering because they have greater torque in the low and mid-RPM ranges than do 4-stroke engines of the same horsepower. Folks with a need for more speed can have a 175 XL OptiMax Pro ($31,895 for boat, motor, and trailer).

Whatever engine's on the stern, the 550 TS Outboard comes with plenty of comfort features. The helm and companion seats swivel and adjust fore and aft, and have angled footrests and handy grab rails. Swivel the companion seat 180 degrees, and it's ideal for observing a waterskier or wakeboarder. The skipper should enjoy watching the grey-faced engine gauges set in a darker grey panel for less glare.

Early Warning. Tahoe includes a water-pressure gauge as standard. Loss of water pressure usually shows up first, prior to engine overheating, so the gauge is a valuable addition to the panel, one that should be found aboard every outboard- or sterndrive-powered boat.

Forward, there's an anchor well designed for a Danforth-style hook. Our test captain noted the lack of a means to belay the anchor rode's bitter end, though. Aft, swim platforms bookend the outboard, with a 4-step ladder to starboard, one step beyond the 3-step ladders traditionally found in boats like this one. A wet-stowage locker is set in the portside platform, ideal for a ski-tow rope. A long locker under the cockpit will hold skis, wakeboards, and related gear.

The Tahoe 550 is the lightest of the four boats, weighing 2,395 lbs. (1,086 kg), and she has the narrowest beam at 7’10” (2.39 m), and the lowest deadrise angle at the transom, 16-degrees. All of this means -- given equal horsepower and the right props -- she should be the fastest boat of the four.

Tahoe 550 TS

Tahoe 550 TS Interior
Tahoe 550 TS Interior
  • LOA: 19'10" (6.05 m)
  • Beam: 7'10" (2.39 m)
  • Draft: 15" (0.38 m)
  • Displacement: 2,395 lbs. (1,086 kg) w/motor
  • Deadrise at the Transom: 16-degrees
  • Fuel Capacity: 33 gal. (125 L)
  • Maximum Power: 175-hp Mercury OptiMax


Chaparral's 21 H2O OB Sport

Chaparral 21 H2O OB Sport
Chaparral's 21 H2O OB Sport has the same signature three-engine cut outs on each quarter just like her bigger, and more expensive, sisters.

Chaparral's 21 H2O OB Sport is a new boat this year, an outboard version of the builder's popular 21 H2O Sport. Although Chaparral positions the H2O line as affordable, the company nevertheless fits out the boats better than "affordable" suggests, with stainless-steel hardware, hydraulic tilt steering with a custom wheel, slide and swivel helm and companion seats, and wraparound bolsters in the forward cockpit.

When Chaparral replaced the sterndrive in the H2O Sport with the Yamaha outboard on the stern of the OB Sport, they left the engine hatch behind -- it now opens to reveal a deep, wide stowage locker, the largest one aboard the boat. The full-beam sunpad atop the hatch has gull wings that can be raised to create a port- or starboard-facing lounge. Like all the upholstery, it's made of premium, stain-resistant vinyl with UV protection. A built-in cooler lives under the aft bench seat.

What about waterskiing? There's an under-sole locker in the cockpit big enough for either skis or wakeboards. Wakeboarders will want the optional folding tower to raise the tow point; it includes a Bimini top. Wakeboard racks are also optional. Other options we'd consider are upgrading helm and companion seats with flip-up bolsters; a bow door to keep the wind out of the cockpit when boating on chilly days; and a mat for the swim platform.

Hull Shape. The 21 H2O OB Sport rides on Chaparral's Extended V-Plane hull: the running surface is carried aft of the transom, under the swim platform. This hull extension adds lift, shortens planing times, improves handling, and adds stability at low speed, according to Chaparral. Our test captain measured planing time at 3.0 seconds, enroute to a top speed of 42.1 knots with a 150-hp Yamaha four-stroke. Yamaha and Mercury outboards up to 200 hp are available.

The Chaparral 21 H2O OB Sport falls roughly in the middle of our four boats in terms of displacement (2,800 lbs. or 1,270 kg), beam (8’4” or 2.45 m) and deadrise at the transom (20-degrees). Obviously, Chaparral has chosen to take a middle course and let her styling and other factors carry the day.

Chaparral 21 H2O OB Sport

Chaparral 21 H2O OB Sport Interior
Chaparral 21 H2O OB Sport Interior
  • LOA: 21'6" (6.55 m)
  • Beam: 8'4" (2.54 m)
  • Draft: 15.5" (.39 m)
  • Displacement: 2,800 lbs. (1,270 kg) w/ motor
  • Deadrise at Transom: 20-degrees
  • Fuel Capacity: 40 gal. (151 L)
  • Maximum Power: 200-hp Mercury or Yamaha


The Glastron GTS 205

Glastron GTS 205
The Glastron GTS 205 is known for its low bow rise when accelerating and its sporty hull graphics.

The Glastron GTS 205 is a slightly upgraded GT 205, one of three models based on the builder's 20'6" (6.25 m) LOA hull. (The third is the fishing-oriented GTSF 205.) How does a Glastron become an "S"? It's mostly racier graphics on the hull and in the cockpit, along with some minor, but useful, upgrades: custom gauges, a fancier steering wheel, rubber decking on the swim platform, etc. The “GTS” is a $1,600 upgrade over the GT 205 ($38,340 vs. $36,740 with a 200-hp MerCruiser 4.5L Alpha sterndrive.)

The GTS 205 is the only one of the four boats in this roundup to carry a sterndrive, a MerCruiser or Volvo Penta up to 300-hp. We haven't tested the GTS 205, so can't comment definitively on her performance. However, we'd expect her numbers to be comparable to the other boats in this roundup, and maybe a bit higher with the biggest power option -- twice as many horses as the 150 OBs driving the other three boats.

Many watersports enthusiasts prefer a sterndrive, which keeps the swim platform clear of obstructions -- easier for donning skis or launching wakeboards, and no powerhead to foul the towline. Glastron offers an extended platform, adding substantially more area to what's an important part of the boat for many people. We highly recommend this option as it gets swimmers farther away from the props (which should not be moving when people are in the water). This is an attribute that the outboard-powered boats don’t have.

As mentioned above, sterndrive V6 engines have more torque at the low end than most 4-cylinder outboards.

The Glastron GTS 205 runs on the builder's patented SSV (Super Stable Vee) bottom, with wide reverse chines carried farther forward than is common on boats in this class. The chines shorten hole-shot times, add lift when running straight, and grip during hard maneuvers. At rest, they add both athwartships and fore-and-aft stability.

Glastron has been building sportboats for more than 60 years, so by now they've got it pretty well figured out. It is now owned by the Beneteau Groupe, one of the largest boat builders in the world.

The Glastron GTS 205 has also taken a middle course among the four boats tested in terms of beam, but she is almost as heavy as the largest boat in this group. And, with a 21-degree deadrise at the transom, she has the deepest deadrise, and that, combined with her displacement, should make her a bit better riding in a chop, all else being equal.

Glastron GTS 205

Glastron GTS 205 Interior
Glastron GTS 205 Interior
  • LOA: 20'6" (6.25 m)
  • Beam: 8'0" (2.44 m)
  • Draft: 18" (.46 m)
  • Displacement: 3,010 lbs. (1,365 kg)
  • Deadrise at Transom: 21-degrees
  • Fuel Capacity: 32 gal. (121 L)
  • Maximum Power: 300-hp MerCruiser or Volvo Penta sterndrive

Again, don’t hesitate to drop BoatTEST.com a note if you have a question about any of these boats.

Ask A Question About Any of These Boats


======================================