Yamaha 242: The Wakeboarding Test - 08/04/2010

Our "test family of four teens” has been at it again: This time they have reported back on how the Yamaha 242 delivers when it comes to wakeboarding. They have sent us the latest batch of pictures from the day older brother Philip was going to teach younger brother Carter how to wakeboard. We also have some interesting feedback from Mom and Dad regarding safety. Hook on your tow line and ease the throttles forward to find out how things turned out, and to see if Mom dared to try the wakeboard this time.

Yamaha 242
Thirteen-year-old Carter prepares for his first attempt at wakeboarding.

The day began with older brother Phil taking to the board first to show younger brother Carter how it’s done. According to Dad, there is a marked difference when pulling a wakeboarder out of the water with the jet-drive-powered Yamaha 242 compared to an inboard or sterndrive model. The acceleration with the 242 is instantaneous and the power is delivered consistently, so much so that you use much less throttle. You also notice with the jet drive that the boat does not squat when you take off, and you have little or no bow rise.

Yamaha 242
In position and ready, Phil gives the go-ahead to take off.
Yamaha 242
As the power is applied, Phil focuses on technique and starts up out of the water.
Yamaha 242
This sequence shows Phil coming up on plane. Notice the output from the twin jet drives.

One of the reasons Mom and Dad chose the 242 was because it is twin engine and jet drive. With a jet-drive boat there are no worries that someone will inadvertently be injured by props. And when the summer activities revolve around skiing, wakeboarding, tubing and swimming, that is a nice safety advantage.

A big hit with the boys is the layout of the stern, plenty of room to strap on the board and easily get in and out of the water. This is due to the size and positioning of the engines. With a jet drive, the drive shaft comes straight out of the engine and connects to the impeller in the jet pump unit, so the engines can be positioned much lower in the hull, providing a higher thrust point.

Yamaha 242
The stern design of the 242 is a nice place to prep and launch from. And for Mom and Dad, the best part is that with jet drives, you have no worries at all about injuries: There are no props for feet or body parts to come in contact with.
Yamaha 242
Sure, he thinks he is ready now. We'll just see.

With a few runs for Phil out of the way, and Carter having a chance to watch how it is done, it was his turn to strap on the board and give it a shot. After a few shaky starts, and the inevitable face plant, Carter got the hang of it and got himself on plane. Not bad for the first try ever, especially when the board is ¾ of his size.

Yamaha 242
As Phil looks on, Carter manages to get up on plane this time. Cue heckling from older brother.
Yamaha 242
Not setting any new records for speed, Carter takes it nice and slow as he gets used to how the board handles.
Yamaha 242
After the wakeboarding adventures, it’s nice to just beach the 242 and hang out for a bit looking for horseshoe crabs.
While the 242 doesn’t produce the same wake as a pro wake/skiboat, the basic family will never know the difference. Our family certainly didn’t and with so many other positive attributes offered by the 242, it doesn’t seem to matter. Our closing shot shows the boat beached after the antics of the day. Dad is a big fan of the shallow water capabilities, especially when boating in Long Island Sound.

If you want to see what our captains think, you can take a look at our full tests of all the Yamaha models here - 


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