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Azimut 64 Flybridge (2010-)
(w/ Currently no test numbers )

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Azimut 64 Flybridge (2010-)
Azimut 64 Flybridge (2010-)

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Never content to float on its laurels, Azimut has just introduced a new 64 Flybridge, a sexy Med-style cruiser the company says is the natural heir to the very successful 62 Evolution. So new that few people have actually seen one in the fiberglass, the 64 looks even more 21st-century than the rest of the Azimut line, although there’s a strong family resemblance to the 62E from which it spawned. The new boat is just, well, a little bit more than the old one: The superstructure is just a tad more rakish, the hullside windows just a little bit bigger, the overall impression just that much more space-age. If you’ve been sitting on your checkbook waiting for a boat that lights your fire, maybe it’s time to uncap your pen.

Specifications

Azimut 64 Flybridge (2010-) Specifications
Length Overall 66' 1''
20.15 m
Dry Weight 35 t
Beam 16' 7''
5.06 m
Tested Weight N/A
Draft 4' 11''
1.51 m
Fuel Cap 1030 gal.
3900 L
Deadrise/Transom N/A Water Cap 258 gal.
980 L
Max Headroom N/A Bridge Clearance N/A
Prices, features, designs, and equipment are subject to change. Please see your local dealer or visit the builder's website for the latest information available on this boat model.

Engine Options

Azimut 64 Flybridge (2010-)Engine options
Std. Power Not Available
Tested Power Currently no test numbers
Opt. Power Not Available

Azimut 64 Flybridge (2010-) Captain's Report

Azimut 64 Flybridge

Dig those big forward windows – they provide lots of light to the VIP stateroom, but will they leak in heavy weather? Azimut says not.

What’s the Mission?

Like all Azimuts, the 64 Flybridge is designed for one thing: Having a lot of fun on the water. We think that water ought to be the Mediterranean, but anyplace warm and sunny will do. This is strictly a boat for hedonists – it’s not for fishing, or long-range cruising, or battling the elements (although it’s built to CE Class A standards, meaning suitable for almost any weather and sea conditions). It’s a boat for leaving the dock after a leisurely breakfast al fresco, racing to a nearby cove, having a swim, enjoying a gourmet lunch. (Don’t worry about the cooking: If you can afford this boat, you can afford a chef.) Then, after a nap, up anchor and off to Portofino or Capri or Ischia or some other trendy spot for a romantic dinner. Maybe clubbing or dancing onshore afterwards, or just a lazy run back home under the stars. It’s all about the fun of doing nothing special on the water. We love it – we’ll buy our fish at the market and take the Azimut 64 as our yacht.

Azimut 64 Flybridge

Azimut calls the flying bridge the “heart” of the 64, and it looks good to us: There’s a big sunpad adjacent to the helm, a table and comfy settee. The sundeck aft can be rigged to carry a tender.

A Life Lived Aloft

Historically, many Italian-designed boats have been a little short in the flying-bridge department – the bridges tend to be low-sided, more for sitting rather than standing, and maybe a bit Spartan compared to the rest of the boat. This is more of an issue for Americans, used to big, roomy, well-protected flying bridges that can be used in any weather. In designing the new 64, Azimut expanded the typical Med-style bridge to make it “the most complete in the category,” according to the company. They say the flying bridge is the boat’s heart, “the center of gravity for the passions of the owner and his guests.”

Azimut 64 Flybridge

Sunpads fore and aft, and on the bridge – can we be anywhere but aboard a Med-style boat? The skipper might get lonely, since there’s no companion seat – but he can talk to whoever’s lounging on the sunpad next to him.

So what’s new about the bridge? It has a newly designed hardtop with a Bimini that can be kept rigged at all speeds, to provide sun protection for the ubiquitous bikinied signorine camped out here. The open back and sides let in the breeze. There’s a table and large, comfortable settee – Azimut calls it a sofa – and a fully equipped barbecue. Aft, the sundeck is big enough for two chaises lounges. Optionally, it can be set up for tender stowage to free up the lifting swim platform.

Azimut 64 Flybridge

The main deck includes a compact galley to port, opposite a dinette just abaft the lower helm, then a saloon proper a couple of steps lower. The absence of bulkheads ties all the spaces together.

We like the higher-than-usual radar arch. Too often Med-style boats have low arches that place the radar scanner just about cranium level for anyone of even average height. The weather is so good in the Med most of the time that nobody thinks of using the radar when on the flying bridge – when the weather’s poor and the radar’s on, everyone is below in the pilothouse anyway. But New World boaters like to keep the scanner spinning all the time, and that’s probably not good for the little grey cells. No worries on the Azimut 64: The arch is plenty tall.

Azimut 64 Flybridge

Azimut increased the height of the radar arch so the microwaves pass harmlessly overhead. The helmsman is on his own, with no companion seat, but a pad bunny catching rays will keep him company. We'd take most of our meals up here.

Azimut 64 Flybridge

Weather too nasty for the flying bridge? Steer from the pilothouse, at the forward end of this just-too-cool saloon. It’s more like the TGV than a boat, or maybe something James Bond would own. We love it.

Azimut 64 Flybridge

The cook’s-eye view. Nobody should complain about being relegated to galley duty on this boat. Belowdecks access is next to the helm.

Beauty Not Just Skin Deep

Sometimes a pretty skin can hide a nasty structure, but that’s not the way they do it at Azimut. Every boat, no matter how nice it looks, is built to take it, with state-of-the-art construction and materials. The 64 Flybridge is built with traditional, proven fiberglass laminates combined with high-tech composites and reinforcements – carbon fiber, for example -- where necessary to achieve strength without excess weight. Certain areas are laminated using resin-infusion for the same reason.

Azimut 64 Flybridge

The master stateroom is ‘midships, with its trademark Azimut catty-corner berth; the cabin also includes a small dinette. The head and hanging locker should insulate the cabin from engine noise, too.

Reducing weight will coax maximum performance from the twin 1,150-hp Caterpillar diesels; we don’t yet know what those performance numbers will be. The boat was introduced only in late June, 2010, so we haven’t had a chance to test it yet. Nor has anyone else, as far as we can discover.

Azimut 64 Flybridge

You can’t beat Italians for design. The 64’s master stateroom is clean and airy, not at all like you’d expect aboard a boat. But maybe what you expect from Azimut. The big hullside windows provide a great view.

Extras

Most owners will hire a crew to maintain their Azimut 64, but might want to do their own piloting. That can be a recipe for disaster, but probably not with this boat. Azimut engineers have developed a computer-controlled Easy Docking system that works with the engines, steering and bow and stern thrusters to make close-quarters maneuvering as easy as it can be. Like pod drives, it’s joystick controlled, and intuitive to use. It also works with straight shafts and rudders – no pods required.

Azimut 64 Flybridge

Even the VIP stateroom is classy, despite its island berth that we usually don’t care for. But this one has lots of room around it, and those great bow windows, too.

Our Recommendation

Easy: If you’ve got the money -- and we don’t know what the Azimut 64 will cost, but it won’t be cheap -- and you want a boat for simply having fun on the water, buy one. You won’t go far wrong, unless you decide to take up fishing.

Azimut 64 Flybridge

If you buy one, give us a call. We’ll be happy to help you try it out.




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Standard and Optional Equipment

Azimut 64 Flybridge (2010-) Standard and Optional Equipment

Standard = Standard Optional = Optional

Azimut 64 Flybridge (2010-) Warranty

Azimut 64 Flybridge (2010-) Warranty Information
Warranties change from time to time. While BoatTEST.com has tried to ensure the most up-to-date warranty offered by each builder, it does not guarantee the accuracies of the information presented below. Please check with the boat builder or your local dealer before you buy any boat.

Full Warranty Information on this brand coming soon!


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