Stingray 208 LR (2011-)
(w/ Currently no test numbers)

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Stingray 208 LR (2011-)
Stingray 208 LR (2011-)
Stingray has built its reputation by producing boats that are fast and reasonably priced. But lately the builder has stepped up and is now offering more features as standard equipment than ever before and this move has certainly added value to its new boats. The 208LR is one of the Stingray's most popular bowriders and our quick look will show you why.

Key Features

  • Exclusive Z-plane hull
  • Floor storage with oversize door
  • Cooler/storage box with drain
  • Performance notched transom
  • Bow anchor storage
  • Bow storage
  • Stainless steel pull-Up cleats
  • Backlit gauges & switches with circuit breakers
  • Integrated electric horn
  • Prem. 36oz. foam backed vinyl with PreFixx
  • Deluxe throttle and trim control
  • Steel burl trim package
  • Power steering (engine driven)

Specifications

Stingray 208 LR (2011-) Specifications
Length Overall 20' 8''
6.3 m
Dry Weight 2,825 lbs.
w/ eng.
Beam 99''
250 cm
Tested Weight N/A
Draft 34''
86 cm
Fuel Cap 35 gal.
132 L
Deadrise/Transom N/A Water Cap 6 gal.
23 L (optional)
Max Headroom open Bridge Clearance 49''
124 cm
Prices, features, designs, and equipment are subject to change. Please see your local dealer or visit the builder's website for the latest information available on this boat model.

Engine Options

Stingray 208 LR (2011-) Engine options
Std. Power Not Available
Tested Power Currently no test numbers
Opt. Power Not Available

Stingray 208 LR (2011-) Captain's Report

Captain's Report by Capt. Steve

Stingray 208 LR

The two-tone hull color option costs only $468 on the Stingray 208LR and you have several color choices. And with the 4.3 L engine she moves.

According to the theoretical calculator on the Stingray website the 208 LR will have a WOT of 52.09 mph powered by a MerCruiser 4.3L MPIC 220-hp engine equipped with a standard 19" aluminum prop, and 450 lbs. (204 kgs.) of people and gear aboard -- and a half tank of fuel. We haven't tested the 208 LR, so we can't comment on that figure, nor give her best cruise speed and fuel consumption. But if and when we do test her, we'll give you a full performance report. In the meantime, let's take a good look at this popular bowrider.

Stingray 208 LR

There is a storage compartment in the sole under the optional snap-in carpet ($446). Both seats swivel and move fore and aft. The cockpit is 32" (81 cm) deep at the helm. We would buy the optional walk-thru flap that goes between the consoles ($105) to help keep us warm on cool mornings.

Gaining Speed

Over the years we have tested a number of Stingrays and we have generally found them to be fast sportboats. So how does Stingray do it?

The answer is that by being focused on speed Stingray does all of the things that need to be done to make the boat fast. First of all the company's designers carefully calculate the beam necessary in the cockpit and work out. In the case of the 208 LR, the maximum molded cockpit width is 81" (205 cm). With that width Stingray is able to have a back bench seat that is wide enough to comfortably seat three adults or four kids, and forward to have enough room for the helm seat, companion to port and an adequate bow walk-thru passageway.

Stingray 208 LR

There is a walk-over passage on the starboard side of the boat connecting the swim platform with the cockpit. The hatch opened reveals a storage compartment that can also be used as a built in cooler. It has a drain to the bilge.

Having done that, the designers know that they must have another 9" (22 cm) on each side of the boat for the width of the gunwales as well as the rub rail. That means they can make the boat just 99" or 8'2" (250 cm) wide. Beam plays an important role in speed. When we look at five Stingray competitors in class we find that several are beamier, and only one is more narrow by 4" (10 cm).

Displacement in Perspective

Weight is another important factor in the speed equation. Here the Stingray 208 LR was the second lightest boat in its class that we compared. She is 75 lbs. (34 kgs.) heavier than the lightest boat in class, and 700 lbs. (318 kgs.) lighter than the heaviest boat we compared. Interestingly, the boat that was the lightest did not have a conventional interior liner, but the 208 LR does have the fiberglass inner liner.

Stingray 208 LR

The depth of the cockpit in the bow is 32" (81 cm), and there is 16" (40 cm) from the cushion to the coaming, which is an inch or so more than many boats in class.

Finally, we come to bottom shape. The 208 LR has a 19-degree deadrise at the transom which we found slightly surprising in a boat that is oriented to max WOT. The deeper the deadrise the harder the boat is to push, but also the more comfortable it will be racing through choppy water. Stingray's designers obviously wanted to go for a fairly good ride, thus 19-degrees was chosen as a compromise between 24-degrees which would be the max and, say, 14-degrees which might be a minimum, and the fastest theoretical running surface in this example.

But Stingray's not-so-secret weapon for speed is what it calls its "Exclusive Z-Plane Hull." That together with a notched transom and a pad on the centerline at the stern provide running surfaces that help the boat scoot.

Stingray 208 LR

We think the bow of the 208 LR is well done and one of the best aspects of the boat. The foot well is fairly wide. We would go for the optional table with stand ($262).

Solid Features

The second thing that impressed us on the 208 LR was the number of features that Stingray is building into the standard price. In total there are 15 optional items that Stingray has listed in the 2012 "Convienence Package" for $2,940.

In looking over this list and the list of Stingray's normal standards, we found several noteworthy items. First, there are six cleats on the boat, two for the bow, two for the stern, and two breast cleats for spring lines. We like that because it is the traditional way a boat should be equipped. Not only are there six cleats, but they are all the stainless steel pull-up type. You only have to slam your toes once into a standard cleat to appreciate this type of cleat.

Stingray 208 LR

This space doubles as a storage bin or an ice chest. It drains into the bilge. We like the fact that you don't have to remove cushions to get to this cooler and the stepping surfaces are wide.

Starting at the bow, there is a beach ladder. Even though this boat is not a deck boat, it has a bow area that has been carefully designed to be as wide as possible for a lot of use. Take a look at the photos. There is a dedicated anchor locker in the bow, and just abaft and a step down is a storage compartment that is ideal for a cooler for the folks up front.

Stingray 208 LR

This helm is done right in our opinion. We like the imitation burl wood treatment and the Italian-made steering wheel. We'd go for the optional compass ($131) and the digital depth sounder at right ($351). Note the horn button is in red at right, and the air craft-type gauges in the center.

At the Helm

At the helm there is a power trim toggle on the throttle, and there is a trim indicator. The boat has power steering and a tilt wheel as standard. The icing on the cake at the helm is the Italian SS steering wheel that fits in perfectly with good-looking analog gauges on the instrument panel.

We like the fact that Stingray uses 36-oz foam-backed vinyl with PreFixx on its upholstery. This is an area where some price boat builders skimp, but they do it at their peril as far as we are concerned. U.V. takes a terrible toll on everything exposed to it and vinyl seat and back rest coverings are probably the most vulnerable item on a boat to U.V. degradation. That's why we are impressed Stingray has gone heavier on the vinyl than many builders by a couple of ounces and added the PreFixx feature to make cleaning easy.

Stingray 208 LR

The swim platform extends over the lower unit in the down position. The length of the bow seating is 55"(139 cm). The boat has 24" (60.9 cm) of freeboard.

The boat comes standard with a Bimini top with boot and quick-connect SS hardware. There also is indirect LED cockpit lighting, which is a nice feature to have at night.

The Price

The 208 LR powered by a MerCruiser 4.3 L MPIC 220-hp engine that we discussed above will cost $35,974 MSRP.

Stingray 208 LR

Yes, you can go wakeboarding from the Stingray 208 LR. The optional wakeboard tower is custom made for Stingray ($2846).



Standard and Optional Equipment

Stingray 208 LR (2011-) Standard and Optional Equipment
Systems
Battery Charger/Converter Optional
CD Stereo Standard
Power Steering Standard
Trim Tabs Optional
Exterior Features
Carpet: Cockpit Optional Snap-in
Outlet: 12-Volt Acc Standard
Swim Ladder Standard
Tower: Watersports Optional
Transom Shower Optional
Canvas
Bimini Top Standard
Cockpit Cover Optional

Standard = Standard Optional = Optional

Stingray 208 LR (2011-) Warranty

Stingray 208 LR (2011-) Warranty Information
Warranties change from time to time. While BoatTEST.com has tried to ensure the most up-to-date warranty offered by each builder, it does not guarantee the accuracies of the information presented below. Please check with the boat builder or your local dealer before you buy any boat.
Hull Warranty
Years 5-year
Blistering Warranty
Years 3-year

Stingray 208 LR (2011-) Price

Stingray 208 LR (2011-) Price
Pricing Range $29,931.00
Prices, features, designs, and equipment are subject to change. Please see your local dealer or visit the builder's website for the latest information available on this boat model.


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